March 2017 - The Service Council

Friday Service Recap: Siri, Alexa, Hotels, Hacking Tractors, and More Customer Service Stories for the Week

By Aly Pinder | Perspective | No Comments

Every week, Sumair and I will post our most interesting service-minded stories for the week as part of a Friday recap. We’ll comment on one story each and then add 3 others for your review.

For the eight installment, and week 13 of 2017:

Sumair’s pick:

Topic: Hacking Tractors for Service
Source: MotherBoard: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/why-american-farmers-are-hacking-their-tractors-with-ukrainian-firmware

Commentary: Equipment manufacturers are finding innovative ways to stave off competition from third-party repair shops. In their pursuit to capture and protect service revenue, OEMs are increasing their use of software and connectivity in their products to limit the reach of third-parties. While the article covers a situation where this is happening in farm equipment, this trend is also occurring in areas of medical devices and other industrial equipment. The issue arises when support resources aren’t readily or easily available to the end customer that needs assistance. While many industries are encouraging self-service to ease the burden on their support centers and to expedite service issues, other industries have yet to find the right balance between self-service and OEM-provided support. Till then, customers have to find unique ways to keep things working.

Aly’s pick:

Topic: Siri vs. Alexa Vying for a Place in a Hotel Near You
Source: TechCrunch: https://techcrunch.com/2017/03/27/amazons-alexa-and-apples-siri-are-waging-war-over-the-hotel-room/

Commentary: The battle between Amazon and Google in the voice assistant market might seem like a reboot of the days of PlayStation vs. Xbox or VCR vs Betamax. But I think this battle royale will be more significant in relation to its impact on business and specifically on customer service. This may seem like sacrilege based on the $91 Billion dollars brought in from the video game industry in 2016, and the ubiquity of a VCR in just about every US home in the late 80’s and 90’s. But the reason I believe the battle for our wallet being waged by Amazon and Google will be bigger is the convergence of customer service expectations and the integration between apps in our world. Most of us, at least in the US, assume we will have seamless service experiences and at a high quality. In this environment, the virtual assistant will not only connect you to answers like “what is the weather outside right now”, but you will be able to order AA batteries with your voice when your kids remote control car dies. And that shipment might just arrive within hours saving a parent the agony of a sobbing child. The integrated nature of this technology to support not only information but also commerce and all at a high level of customer service becomes a game-changer. I haven’t made my decision yet on which product I will purchase for my family, but as this article highlights hotels might tilt this battle soon. And the hotel industry’s desire to incorporate this technology only further highlights its impact on delivering high levels of service. Hotel chains want to do whatever they can to provide patrons with anything they need, and Siri or Alexa have the ability to make this job much easier and seamless.

Our Three Other Articles
1- Wayfair’s Innovative Recruitment Methods Help Drive Their Award Winning Customer Service (Forbes, 3/28/17)
2- Why Luxury Brands Need to Focus on the Human Customer Experience (Chief!Marketer, 3/24/17)
3- Uber for Car Repair (GeekWire, 3/28/17)

If interested in viewing our latest data and insight, please visit: http://info.servicecouncil.com/recent-content-and-events

We would love to have you become part of our research panel. If you would like to, please visit http://info.servicecouncil.com/tsc-join-a-research-group and select the area(s) of alignment. (* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Till next week.

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Officer
sd@servicecouncil.com or @suma1r

Building a Field Service Lead Generation Program the Right Way

By Sumair Dutta | Perspective | One Comment

There is an increased responsibility on field service organizations to complement operational and customer facing improvements with commercial results. In our 2016 field service research, the lack of revenue opportunities was seen as a major strategic challenge by 40% of organizations. To encounter this challenge a number of organizations were looking at their front-line field service personnel to identify new business opportunities (aka Leads) or to sell when in front of the customer. Most organizations currently have some form of a field service lead program in place and more are beginning to equip their engineers with the tools necessary to sell. There’s not enough room to debate if field engineers should be selling in the first place. In our research, we’re finding that more field service customers are accepting of a sales approach from a field service engineer if they have a relationship with that engineer or if the engineer has resolved their current challenge and is working to provide them with additional value.

In terms of field service lead generation, there are several best practices to consider when building a program. These practices were reinforced in recent TSC IdeaShare focused on pertinent field service metrics. On the discussion, Jack Kleminich from Tyco SimplexGrinnell spoke of his learnings in developing a $50m+/yr field service lead generation program.

Develop a Dedicated Lead Management Process and Support it With Technology

Lead generation must be easy and effective if the field service team is going to bother with the added responsibility. Field engineers will abandon the process immediately if it doesnt work. Typically, the two major failure points occur around lead follow-up by sales and in lead-affiliated compensation for field service engineers. A lot of the core areas of lead management can be automated with the aid of mobile and CRM solutions. That said, its essential that there is well thought out process for how leads are managed throughout the entire sales cycle, all the way from identification to closure.

Deliver Training Materials at All Levels of Field Service

Change management is essential in the rollout of any new program. Poor attention to this often leads to unsuccessful adoption of the program and poor attainment of desired goals. Its likely that field service engineers will resist when asked to participate in lead generation as they will see this as a proxy to selling. Therefore, organizations need to prepare this engineers on the purpose of the program and then reinforce the impact of the program on all stakeholders impacted, including the customer. Once purpose has been established, the ‘how’ of lead generation needs to be reinforced with training sessions and materials. Preferably training content and scripts are available on-demand for engineers to refresh their knowledge as needed. Its also essential that relevant instructional content is developed for multiple parties in the field service chain, starting with the engineers and moving up to supervisors and regional leaders.

Communicate and Then Communicate Some More

In this day and age of mobile content and self-service portals, it might seem silly to develop flyers and brochures to reinforce the message of a lead program, but these methods do work. The message is simple, the more a program is discussed and reinforced, the more it is adopted. In addition to reinforcing steps, best practices, and procedures, its also beneficial to reinforce the value of the program in the form of engineer success stories or customer results. What’s even more impactful is an actual testimonial from a customer of how the extra time spent by a front-line engineer directly impacted the customer’s results and outcome.

Ensure Visibility Across the Lead Lifecycle

Part of the communication process involves giving engineers visibility into the status of their leads. If its assumed that leads are just going into a black hole, the lead pipeline will eventually dry out. Engineers don’t need to see every lead be successful, they just need to know that their effort is being followed up on.

Push for Sales Accountability

The monetary value of a service lead might not compare with that of a regular sales opportunity. This might be enough to detract sales people from following up on service-generated leads. Therefore, its essential that sales leadership is bought into driving accountability for a service lead program. An easy way to do this is to show the impact that top performing regions or districts are having when it comes to top-line revenue. If sales isn’t motivated by that performance, business leadership will be.

Compensation – Make it Timely

Most organizations develop a financial reward system for field service engineers based on leads closed. Some offer incentives for lead generation. The issue is that most programs stop here. While the field engineer cares about the amount of recognition received, they care more about getting recognized in a timely and painless manner. They shouldn’t have to fight for the recognition or have to wait for it for a considerable amount of time. Therefore, its essential that the reward system developed, monetary or otherwise, is efficient enough to deliver the reward to the field engineer in an expedited manner.

Evaluate Metrics that Drive Action

Activity drives results and while its essential to measure the impact of a lead generation program to garner further buy in, its absolutely essential to track activity-based metrics as leading indicators. These metrics could include participation rates, referrals per tech, and average cycle or follow up time for leads. In our recent IdeaShare, Tyco SimplexGrinnell indicated that they use an engineer confidence index to measure the health of their lead program. The index measures how confident the engineers are in their ability to get paid on leads. The higher the confidence, the greater the activity.

We’ve worked with organizations that have developed and grown lead generation programs into significant revenue contributors. These programs don’t require a great deal of investment from a technology point-of-view, but they do require leadership, a rigorous process, and a focus on change.

If interested in participating in our 2017 research on service sales and marketing and service lead generation, please join our dedicated research group to the topic. If you’d like to chat with members of our community on lead generation, including Jack Kleminich from Tyco SimplexGrinnell, drop me a line.

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Office
sd@servicecouncil.com

Friday Service Recap: Zappos, Chatbots, the Perfect Order, and More Customer Service Stories for the Week

By Aly Pinder | Perspective | No Comments

Every week, Sumair and I will post our most interesting service-minded stories for the week as part of a Friday recap. We’ll comment on one story each and then add 3 others for your review.

For the seventh installment, and week 12 of 2017:

Aly’s pick:

Topic: Zappos & the 1-800-Line to a Human
Source: If Chatbots Win, Customers Lose, Says Zappos Customer Service Expert: https://www.forbes.com/sites/micahsolomon/2017/03/23/customers-lose-if-chatbots-win-says-zappos-customer-service-expert/#112fbc336087

Commentary: The impact of artificial intelligence and chatbots in customer service is more than science fiction (as seen in our “Other Articles” below). But when should organizations use machines to deliver service and when is the human touch more appropriate? The customer experience is important for businesses and missing an opportunity to deliver value is no longer acceptable. As seen in recent summary findings from our CEx research, 94% of organizations state the improvement of the customer experience is a priority for their business with 68% seeing CX as a differentiator. These findings only muddy the water regarding how service organizations need to approach the use of technology to support customers in a more efficient way which may be less friendly (but less costly). If CX is so important and the way in which you beat out your competition for share of wallet and new customers, why would you ever leave service to a robot. I think the sweet spot is finding which interactions your customers are ok with an android and which demand empathy and that extra mile only delivered (currently) by a human. Sometimes you just need a simple answer which can be delivered quickly via an automated solution. In these cases, waiting for a human might be more frustrating for a customer. So, I don’t think the Zappos stance of a human interaction as always being the interaction which provides the most value as true for all businesses, but I would definitely be a customer for life if a human customer service agent went the extra mile(s) to return my prized possession.

Sumair’s pick:

Topic: Perfect Orders and Customer Satisfaction
Source: Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevebanker/2016/02/03/a-leading-computer-manufacturers-perfect-order-journey/#38f42be46582

Commentary: This is an interesting piece on Dell’s use of Perfect Order Metric (POM) as an indicator of customer satisfaction. POM is a compound metric built on other performance metrics and is used in supply chain management. There are other compound metrics such as the perfect pick used in warehouse management. POM has its critics and detractors but is a valuable benchmarking resource especially when based on factors that are most important to customers. In Dell’s instance, customers wanted the organization to improve in areas measured by the metric, therefore allowing for a better link between results and customer loyalty scores.

Does field service need a compound metric? We investigated this concept a while back. It might be difficult to compare the metric across organizations with varying field service models, but it could be a vital number for organizations to consider when evaluating or tracking their progress.

Our Three Other Articles
1- Customer Service Chatbots Are About to Become Frighteningly Realistic (MIT Review, 3/22/17)
2- Improving Customer Experience With Marketing Analytics At 3 Day Blinds (Forbes, 3/23/17)
3- Bad Customer Service Mistakes That Will Destroy Your Business (Small Business Trends, 3/20/17)

If interested in viewing our latest data and insight, please visit: http://info.servicecouncil.com/recent-content-and-events

We would love to have you become part of our research panel. If you would like to, please visit http://info.servicecouncil.com/tsc-join-a-research-group and select the area(s) of alignment. (* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Till next week.

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Officer
sd@servicecouncil.com or @suma1r

Friday Service Recap: AHT, Service Excellence, Silos, and More Customer Service Stories for the Week

By Aly Pinder | Uncategorized | No Comments

Every week, Sumair and I will post our most interesting service-minded stories for the week as part of a Friday recap. We’ll comment on one story each and then add 3 others for your review.

For the sixth installment, and week 11 of 2017:

Sumair’s pick:

Topic: AHT. It’s time to Move On.
Source: HBR: https://hbr.org/2017/02/call-length-is-the-worst-way-to-measure-customer-service

Commentary: We agree that AHT (average handle time) shouldn’t be the barometer for customer support performance. As customers engage in a higher degree of self-service for low complexity issues, they are likely to reach out for live support for issues that are complex and require proper diagnosis and care. In this, putting agents on the clock drives the wrong behavior. TSC’s research has shown that organizations are slowly gravitating towards a framework of scores to measure customer service and customer experience. Most organizations still look at CSAT and loyalty scores. An emerging group, 37% of our group, now measure and evaluate customer experience on the basis of customer effort or ease of doing business.

The authors do indicate that AHT is useful for an organization to assess its overall performance and its cost drivers and can help prioritize future investments. That said, agent performance and recognition should be based on resolution as opposed to speed.

Aly’s pick:

Topic: Breaking down silos to create culture of service
Source: Marketing Week: https://www.marketingweek.com/2017/03/09/siloes-bureaucracy-holding-back-customer-experience-study-finds/

Commentary: The siloed organization is nothing new. I feel like we’ve discussed this topic for a decade already, if not longer. But as this article highlights IT departments are still siloed from service, and HR still doesn’t work with customer support to identify and deploy a strategy. For service organizations that mainly support break/fix, reactive service engagements, the entire organization may not be needed and thus a siloed structure won’t cause havoc. But as service models evolve to being more proactive and predictive, other teams are needed to successfully deliver service. For example, IT is needed to design equipment to capture performance data, HR is needed to hire service workers with soft skills, and sales is needed to position contracts that charge for predictive support. As recent TSC data shows one of the top reasons why innovative projects like IoT connectivity don’t get off the ground is the inability to gain internal buy-in across departments (as stated by 41% of respondents) – silos of thought, strategy, and action. Service is a team game and the entire organization needs to be involved and bought-in to achieve service excellence and wow customers. If walls remain between functions of the business, the ability to deliver innovations in service will remain stunted.

Our Three Other Articles
1- Customer service still makes the difference at Mequon Ace (OnMilwaukee, 3/14/17)
2- VW Korea promotes higher customer service through ‘We Care’ campaign (The Korea Herald, 3/16/17)
3- In a tiny town, a phone company right out of a Rockwell painting (The Boston Globe, 3/11/17)

If interested in viewing our latest data and insight, please visit: http://info.servicecouncil.com/recent-content-and-events

We would love to have you become part of our research panel. If you would like to, please visit http://info.servicecouncil.com/tsc-join-a-research-group and select the area(s) of alignment. (* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Till next week.

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Officer
sd@servicecouncil.com or @suma1r

Friday Service Recap: Tesla, Customer Loyalty, the Banking Industry and More Customer Service Stories for the Week

By Aly Pinder | News, Perspective | No Comments

Every week, Sumair and I will post our most interesting service-minded stories for the week as part of a Friday recap. We’ll comment on one story each and then add 3 others for your review.

For the fifth installment, and week 10 of 2017:

Aly’s pick:

Topic: Sales practices threaten customer satisfaction in banking industry
Source: HousingWire: http://www.housingwire.com/articles/39475-jd-power-sales-practices-threaten-customer-satisfaction-in-banking-industry

Commentary: A customer’s trust should be invaluable to a service organization. Customer loyalty and advocacy are levels of satisfaction that most service organizations strive to achieve. This article highlights how this trust and loyalty should have been treated with reverence and not like a blank check. The customer and their best interests should always be a priority and not only when times are tough, as was the case after the financial crisis in the banking industry. To avoid some of the issues in regard to a sales team and a customer support team with different goals, organizations must look to create a culture of transparency, collaboration across functions (i.e., sales, service), and a customer first attitude. These three areas combined force a long-term vision of the organization and its responsibility to its customers, and not a short-term return.

Sumair’s pick:

Topic: Tesla Faces Customer Service Hiccups as it Ramps Up
Source: Motely Fool: https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/03/07/repairing-my-tesla-model-s-has-been-an-utter-night.aspx

Commentary: There are several Tesla customer service stories hitting the web, but the overarching concern is if Tesla can ramp up its service operations to support nearly a half-million new customers in the next two years tied to its Model 3 release. If the company continues to follow its current model of company-owned sales and service centers, then it certainly needs to ramp up its capabilities to effectively meet service needs. This might create an untenable capital situation given the number of stores and employees needed to support a growing mass of customers. In that, Tesla might have to rethink its direct sales and support strategy and adapt a hybrid version where dealers are introduced into its network. The company currently uses certified third-party stores for cosmetic work, a strategy that has led to this current customer service storm.

Our Three Other Articles
1- McDonalds simplifies its Ice Cream machines to Cool Customer Complaints (Inc., 3/6/17)
2- Machine Learning Used to Improve Customer Service (Tech Republic, 3/9/17)
3- DFW Airport named No. 1 in customer service in North America (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 3/6/17)

If interested in viewing our latest data and insight, please visit: http://info.servicecouncil.com/recent-content-and-events

We would love to have you become part of our research panel. If you would like to, please visit http://info.servicecouncil.com/tsc-join-a-research-group and select the area(s) of alignment. (* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Till next week.

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Officer
sd@servicecouncil.com or @suma1r

Friday Service Recap: Human Voice, 24-hour Customer Support, Hulu Live and More Customer Service Stories for the Week

By Aly Pinder | News, Perspective | No Comments

Every week, Sumair and I will post our most interesting service-minded stories for the week as part of a Friday recap. We’ll comment on one story each and then add 3 others for your review.

For the fourth installment, and week 9 of 2017:

Sumair’s pick:

Topic: Human Voice and its Impact on Work
Source: MIT Sloan Management Review: http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/why-the-human-voice-is-the-years-most-important-technology/

Commentary: Voice can be a powerful agent, especially when it relates to field based work. We (The Service Council) have previously commented on how voice-based interactive agents can support field service engineers get their work done. Quite often the eye shifts to augmented reality and the impact of that technology on solving field-based issues. We do believe in the long-run impact of AR in the field, the impact will be more significant in the area of training. In saying that, voice-based interactive agents can greatly assist field agents complete basic tasks of order entry and recording without actually having to spend the time on recording those tasks in a mobile application. In our direct-to-engineer surveys, we found that the time spent on administrative tasks was the most significant headache for field engineers in their day-to-day work (Read more here). Removing these headaches can have a significant impact on field-based productivity.

Aly’s pick:

Topic: Hulu adds 24-hour customer support as it goes Live
Source: Reuters: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-hulu-services-idUSKBN16904T

Commentary: Competition and customer attrition have shown a bright light on the impact of good customer service. This is not unique to the world of TV services such as Hulu, and has led organizations in both B2B and B2C markets to focus on customer experience as a key differentiator. For Hulu, investments in a 24-hour non-stop customer support team should have been a no-brainer and not a result of seeing at times up to a 50% customer defection. But a lost customer isn’t the only threat, poor customer service can lead to negative social media which has a broader reach than just a factor of one. Customer support in the age of social and heightened customer expectations demands that service agents can be reached (across support channels) and they have the right answer when an issue arises. Customer service still seems to be a reaction to unmet customer needs as opposed to a strategic aspect of the service business. Businesses, regardless of industry, need to view support as a strategic differentiator and not something to be added as a response to a growing number of complaints.

Our Three Other Articles
1- Alexa could pick up your next customer service call (CNET, 2/28/17)
2- Great Customer Service Starts with a Clear Purpose (Harvard Business Review, 2/28/17)
3- How to Get Better Customer Service, and Skip the Rage (New York Times, 2/28/17)

If interested in viewing our latest data and insight, please visit: http://info.servicecouncil.com/recent-content-and-events

We would love to have you become part of our research panel. If you would like to, please visit http://info.servicecouncil.com/tsc-join-a-research-group and select the area(s) of alignment. (* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Till next week.

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

Sumair Dutta
Chief Customer Officer
sd@servicecouncil.com or @suma1r

Don’t Let a $300 Part Ground Your Business

By Aly Pinder | Perspective | No Comments

Can a $300 part be mission critical, to a billion-dollar business? Well, it is if it happens to be the last $300 part available and the one needed to get a Boeing 777 off the ground from Seattle to Dubai. I recently came across just this event in an article by Deena Kamel “Emirates says Flight was Delayed After Delta Withheld $300 Spare Part,” Bloomberg, last modified Feb 9, 2017, https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-09/emirates-says-flight-was-delayed-as-delta-withheld-300-spare.

Shared Parts Amongst the Competition

The airline industry has an agreement amongst carriers that they will share parts if and when one is needed to support each other’s operations, as per article. Competition is a big part of the airline business, but the industry attempts to keep all planes in the air by sharing spare parts when one is needed.

But this system broke down for Emirates when they required a minor hydraulic component. They didn’t have one and the one provided them by Delta Air Lines was taken back after it was initially offered. It is unclear if the part was installed on the Emirates plane or just in the process to be installed. Delta’s reason for pulling the part back from their peer, “it was the last part of its kind in Delta inventory.” And Delta has a policy that maintains they must always have at least one part on hand per location at all times. So even though they had initially granted Emirates the part, it had to be pulled back just in case Delta had a failure of their own. This caused a six-plus hour delay for the Emirates flight, and led to some very unhappy Emirates’ passengers as their 14.5-hour flight just became 20+.

How Could this Have been Avoided?

A couple lessons come to mind as I ponder this story –

1. Have a Plan – Service is an unpredictable beast. As I think back to my days in warehouse management, even when we had more information than we thought we needed we often found ourselves at the mercy of the smallest hiccups which changed our day. This case is no different, a $300 part delaying a whole flight destined to travel across the world seems absurd. However, even though Emirates had a plan and a back-up to that plan, there was still a breakdown. Their plans and partners need to be tested and ready for changes in conditions. Understanding which parts are mission critical, which should be stocked for a rainy day, which partners have the surplus to support your equipment, and which partners can be relied upon is imperative. Forecasting service demand and having combined visibility into partner inventory will provide more than peace of mind – it will provide certain that issues can be resolved.

2. Know What’s in Inventory – Despite not being on the “losing end” of this story, Delta must also understand their vulnerability here. The service team on the ground in Seattle didn’t have visibility into the parts inventory and needed to be told by central headquarters that this particular part needed to be held on to. As soon as this part became the last part available under this number, notifications and triggers should have gone off to notify procurement to source more. This occurrence should have also been communicated to the Seattle team to let them know not to offer the part up in the first place. This lack of visibility and communication between top and front lines across the service chain resulted in more than just bad press; and all of it could have been avoided.

3. Parts Have an Impact on the Customer Experience – Parts often get a bad rap. Unless they are needed, they often are an afterthought. But as this example proves, one part can greatly impact a business and the travel plans of an entire plane. I don’t think consumers will research which airlines are using which parts management solutions as part of their selection criteria, as price and comfort will most likely reign for the time being. But if enough flights get grounded because the right part isn’t available at the time of need, customers will begin to equate the likelihood of having a great flight experience with the likelihood that ACME Airline has an efficient service supply chain.

This example of a failed service call highlights the impact of parts fill rates in relation to first time fix and resolution rates for organizations. We recently held a conversation between a few service executives and discussed some of their challenges in regard to parts management. Fill rates and their impact on SLAs and resolution was a particularly engaging portion of the call. For these organizations, the path to improving part fill rates organizations relied on enhanced parts planning, increased visibility across the entire service supply chain, and comprehensive performance management of partners. If Delta had visibility into their inventory or had communicated the process properly, they would have been able to decline the request from Emirates earlier on. Therefore, allowing Emirates to search for another partner avoiding the customer service and PR headaches of this delayed resolution. Both sides of this equation need to re-evaluate their operations and ensure a critical error like this is an anomaly.


Tell Your Service Parts Story

We plan on tackling more aspects of parts management throughout the year. If you are interested in joining our Parts research group, please follow this link.* We will launch the first TSC benchmark for the parts group in mid-March 2017. If you would like to participate please join the research group. If you just want to know what research projects we’re working on, come back for updates HERE.

(* Participation in research groups is reserved for practitioners only. Consultants and technology solution providers are not allowed to join and will be referred to other ways of getting involved.)

Aly Pinder
Director of Member Research & Communities
ap@servicecouncil.com or @pinderjr

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