Installed Base Revenue Growth: Lessons from Hayward Gordon

By August 19, 2017 Perspective No Comments

At The Service Council, we get to track major trends impacting the service areas of manufacturing and other businesses. For the past 3-5 years, we have consistently seen the following priorities rise to the top of the service leader’s list.

  1. Enhance the level of predictability in service operations and customer response
  2. Provide a differentiated customer experience
  3. Support revenue growth initiatives

We find that most organizations now have revenue objectives for their service and support businesses. As seen in the image below, these revenue pressures arise as the organization is looking to combat competition or commoditization in the product side of the business. Service is often seen as a source of revenue as well as a direct contributor to profit margins.
TSC Data - The Focus on Service Revenue
Most organizations, even those with revenue programs in place, continue to struggle with the identification and prioritization of revenue growth opportunities. It’s not that there isn’t enough data to dissect and analyze, it’s just that there is limited guidance on what data to sift through and prioritize. In addition to making sense of revenue opportunities, organizations often stumble with change management in ensuring that revenue opportunities are followed up on by dedicated sales or account management.

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a short webinar (listen) on the topic of revenue growth in the aftermarket. Joining me on the webinar were Mandar Parikh from Entytle and Steve Evans from Hayward Gordon. If you don’t know Hayward Gordon, they are a manufacturer of industrial pumps in mixers and have been in business for more than 60 years. You can hear more about their story on the webinar recording (listen), but it echoes that of several service organizations that we speak to. Their primary customer market (mining, and oil and gas) has experienced and continues to experience a slowdown and the company was looking to service or the aftermarket to uncover new revenue opportunities.

In their pursuit of these opportunities, the company embarked on a customer connectivity program, aimed at being more proactive in understanding customer needs. The intent of this program was to listen to customers and to consistently connect with them to offer value. To prioritize which customers to connect with, the organization contracted with the team at Entytle to review available aftermarket and customer data to identify potential opportunities for contact coverage, parts sales, and more. Once again, more about the path taken and results seen can be captured on the webinar. What I found most amazing (and valuable) were Hayward Gordon’s keys to success. These keys can be applied to most projects, but they become extremely pertinent in projects where data analysis serves as the precursor for a modified approach around customer outreach.

  1. Attain Senior Management Buy In. In any revenue-associated project that touches sales, one must get the buy in of sales leadership. If it’s not a priority of sales leadership, then it won’t be a priority for sales personnel.
  2. Focus the Effort. Hayward Gordon’s initial foray into opportunity identification was too broad, required too much data, and yielded too many pathways. The company found its rhythm when it narrowed down its focus to 3 primary types of pumps with proprietary and high dollar value parts. This allowed to team to specialize its approach to and discussion with customers.
  3. Know Who to Talk To. Different customer stakeholders have different obligations and pain points. The equipment operator cares about different things when compared to a plant or site manager. It’s vital that sales or account management approach the right customer in proactive communication and outreach programs.
  4. Communicate to Change. Proactivity around customer communication and value can’t just be a one-time program. It must be built into the culture of the sales and account management organization. To attain this, it is vital that the organization consistently make its team aware of the value delivered (to the customer, to the organization, to the individual) via an investment in customer approach.

You can hear more of the Hayward Gordon story and see some of our research via the on-demand version of the webinar (listen). If interested in learning more about our research on service revenue or other pertinent topics to the service leader, feel free to reach out to me at sd@servicecouncil.com

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