Predictive Service is Just Part of a Proactive Support Strategy

By December 13, 2017 Perspective No Comments

In organizations that manufacture or service equipment, there is a great push towards predictive service outcomes. With the help of more detailed data, organizations have a greater confidence in being able to predict part or equipment failure leading to a corrective, or predictive, service action.

Most equipment-centric organizations are and should be moving towards this predictive model. Yet, building and operationally executing on a predictive model is one thing, managing the internal and external change that comes with a transformed model is another. Most organizations haven’t figured this out yet. I’ve also begun to observe that organizations seem to equate predictive service with proactive service. To me, this seems inaccurate. Predictive service is and should be part of a proactive service strategy, but isn’t the only component. Desired outcomes for the product and outcomes for the customer are not always the same. Let me explain by sharing three examples of proactive initiatives being spearheaded by organizations in our community.

Proactive Escalation Management

HPE’s Rusty Walther, the VP of Global Escalation Management and a member of The Service Council’s Advisory Board, claims that no one calls him when they’re having a good day. If Walther is on the phone, something has gone wrong and it’s up to his global escalations team at HPE to react and respond to make sure that major issues are triaged and handled appropriately. However, Rusty and his team are now leveraging data to begin to identify future escalations before they happen. With the aid of an internally developed Customer Health Index (based on things that have happened) and a Customer Impact Score (things that are going to happen – updates, alerts etc.) the Global escalation team can isolate those customers that might have future service or business escalations 6 months prior to occurrence. Armed with this insight, dedicated account managers can reach out to and work with the accounts to prevent a future situation. Best of all, now the Customer’s good day is HPE’s good day.

Proactive Communication and Installed Base Management

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a short webinar (listen) on the topic of revenue growth in the aftermarket. Joining me on the webinar was Steve Evans from Hayward Gordon, a manufacturer of industrial pumps and mixers, and Mandar Parikh, VP of Product at Entytle, who has developed an Aftermarket Engagement Platform for manufacturers. Note: Entytle is a TSC partner. Hayward Gordon was looking for an aftermarket revenue boost due to a slowing product market (mining, oil and gas). Therefore, the organization decided to embark on a proactive listening and communication campaign with the aid of the solution provided by Entytle, to identify how its customers were using their products and services. Hayward Gordon prioritized customer outreach to those that owned specific pumps with high-value (high cost of failure) parts. In speaking to these customers, the organization identified numerous sales and account management opportunities tied to service contracts and service parts that helped revenue fortunes but also drove value for customers.

Proactive Quality Control

Not every predicted product failure can be rectified. It might be too expensive to do so or the value of the replacement or predictive action might not warrant the investment in time and labor. This is true for organizations supporting a high-volume of non-complex products or equipment. That said, the analysis of fault codes, part usage data, and repair procedures, can enable organizations to identify and isolate product or part quality issues. The proper recognition of these issues can enable the service organization to:

  • Proactively communicate with its customers
  • Prevent issues from occurring in future product releases

Several organizations in our community leverage this closed loop process to improve product quality and to enhance service outcomes.

The examples above highlight proactive approaches to issue avoidance, to customer communication, and to value generation. While predictive failure information can support the approaches above, it is only a piece of an overall proactive customer management plan.

We’re going to be spending more time analyzing the components of a proactive service strategy in the coming months via research, interviews, and more. If interested in sharing your perspective, please connect with me directly at If you are interested in becoming a research panelist for our proactive research survey (Jan 2018), feel free to contact me directly or to align yourself with our Leadership & Strategy research panel here.

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