December 2017 - The Service Council

Looking to Boost Your CSat Scores? Consider Elevating Field Service

By Sumair Dutta | Perspective | No Comments

On the journey to raise profitability, a large number of organizations look to improve customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, and customer share of wallet. It is vital for organizations to keep their customers satisfied, and to leverage that satisfaction to drive higher levels of loyalty and customer spend.

Typical CSat improvement initiatives focus on the contact center and rightly so. But very few consider the impact of the improvement of field service on CSat scores. Field service has always been treated as an operational challenge with very little consideration for the customer impact. Well, in our research of over 150 field service leaders, we found that investing in field service performance can significantly impact customer satisfaction results. In the chart below, we measured field service performance in first-time fix and you can see the relationship between increased first-time fix and customer satisfaction.
First-Time Fix and Customer Satisfaction
There’s something to be said about first-time fix. 100% first-time fix can be quite expensive and the cost of the additional percentage point could break the bank. Yet, it is an incredibly important metric in measuring field service performance for the simple reason that it actually measures work being done vs. just getting to work. Think about it, if someone comes to your home but doesn’t resolve that heater issue that you have, you would be fairly disappointed. Now replace that heater with an MRI machine at a hospital or an airline engine on an idle plane.

How can one work on elevating first-time fix?

  1. Better Diagnosis and Triage at Issue Identification to Determine the Appropriate Resolution Path
  2. Improved Training of Agents in the Field to Support a Higher Level of Performance
  3. Better Access to Resolution Information at the Point-of-Service to Support Problem Diagnosis and Resolution
  4. Increased Use of Intelligent Scheduling to Ensure Dispatch of the Appropriate Resources

Sending the wrong technician is expensive and creates customer angst. Sending the right technician with the right tools and information can make all the difference in improving field service and customer satisfaction performance.

I recently spoke on the topic of elevating field service performance. Feel free to listen in for our performance enhancement recommendations.

We’d love to have you join our field service research panel for 2018. If interested, please visit our research participation page. We look forward to working with you on 2018 research projects.

Predictive Service is Just Part of a Proactive Support Strategy

By Sumair Dutta | Perspective | No Comments

In organizations that manufacture or service equipment, there is a great push towards predictive service outcomes. With the help of more detailed data, organizations have a greater confidence in being able to predict part or equipment failure leading to a corrective, or predictive, service action.

Most equipment-centric organizations are and should be moving towards this predictive model. Yet, building and operationally executing on a predictive model is one thing, managing the internal and external change that comes with a transformed model is another. Most organizations haven’t figured this out yet. I’ve also begun to observe that organizations seem to equate predictive service with proactive service. To me, this seems inaccurate. Predictive service is and should be part of a proactive service strategy, but isn’t the only component. Desired outcomes for the product and outcomes for the customer are not always the same. Let me explain by sharing three examples of proactive initiatives being spearheaded by organizations in our community.

Proactive Escalation Management

HPE’s Rusty Walther, the VP of Global Escalation Management and a member of The Service Council’s Advisory Board, claims that no one calls him when they’re having a good day. If Walther is on the phone, something has gone wrong and it’s up to his global escalations team at HPE to react and respond to make sure that major issues are triaged and handled appropriately. However, Rusty and his team are now leveraging data to begin to identify future escalations before they happen. With the aid of an internally developed Customer Health Index (based on things that have happened) and a Customer Impact Score (things that are going to happen – updates, alerts etc.) the Global escalation team can isolate those customers that might have future service or business escalations 6 months prior to occurrence. Armed with this insight, dedicated account managers can reach out to and work with the accounts to prevent a future situation. Best of all, now the Customer’s good day is HPE’s good day.

Proactive Communication and Installed Base Management

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a short webinar (listen) on the topic of revenue growth in the aftermarket. Joining me on the webinar was Steve Evans from Hayward Gordon, a manufacturer of industrial pumps and mixers, and Mandar Parikh, VP of Product at Entytle, who has developed an Aftermarket Engagement Platform for manufacturers. Note: Entytle is a TSC partner. Hayward Gordon was looking for an aftermarket revenue boost due to a slowing product market (mining, oil and gas). Therefore, the organization decided to embark on a proactive listening and communication campaign with the aid of the solution provided by Entytle, to identify how its customers were using their products and services. Hayward Gordon prioritized customer outreach to those that owned specific pumps with high-value (high cost of failure) parts. In speaking to these customers, the organization identified numerous sales and account management opportunities tied to service contracts and service parts that helped revenue fortunes but also drove value for customers.

Proactive Quality Control

Not every predicted product failure can be rectified. It might be too expensive to do so or the value of the replacement or predictive action might not warrant the investment in time and labor. This is true for organizations supporting a high-volume of non-complex products or equipment. That said, the analysis of fault codes, part usage data, and repair procedures, can enable organizations to identify and isolate product or part quality issues. The proper recognition of these issues can enable the service organization to:

  • Proactively communicate with its customers
  • Prevent issues from occurring in future product releases

Several organizations in our community leverage this closed loop process to improve product quality and to enhance service outcomes.

The examples above highlight proactive approaches to issue avoidance, to customer communication, and to value generation. While predictive failure information can support the approaches above, it is only a piece of an overall proactive customer management plan.

We’re going to be spending more time analyzing the components of a proactive service strategy in the coming months via research, interviews, and more. If interested in sharing your perspective, please connect with me directly at sd@servicecouncil.com. If you are interested in becoming a research panelist for our proactive research survey (Jan 2018), feel free to contact me directly or to align yourself with our Leadership & Strategy research panel here.

The Agile Field Service Workforce

By Sumair Dutta | Perspective | No Comments

No, this is not a blog about an exercise or stretching regime to attain an agile field service workforce. Its more of a discussion about planning for the future field service workforce. In our opinion (as The Service Council) the time is right for service leaders to rethink the field service workforce of the future given the growing options available for work distribution and workforce selection.

Agile, as a methodology, is primarily applied to software development and delivery. It is also being used by several organizations in product development and research. The first principle of the Agile manifesto is to ‘satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.’ While not all the principles of the Agile methodology are applicable to workforce planning and development, the focus on customer-centricity and responsiveness are transferable.

Field service, as a profession, continues to face disruption from enhancements in automation. While service demand for manual field service work continues to remain high and will likely remain high for the short-term, investments in technology are being driven to reduce the need for manual field service intervention or to enhance the productivity of the currently employed workforce. As the current field service workforce ages and retires, service leaders are increasingly looking to automation to replace field work hours before making the decision to hire net new workers.

Where manual intervention is necessary, field service leaders now have an increasing number of workforce options to meet service needs. This becomes extremely pertinent when workforce demand is seasonal or even unpredictable. Being able to scale up or scale down in a short period of time is something that many field service leaders are looking for in the workforce of the future. The options available fall under three major categories:

  • Employee workforce – Full-time field service employees
  • Partner workforce – Authorized service providers, dealers, distributors
  • Extended workforce – Contractors, freelancers, crowdsourcing

To manage the work allocated to these various types of workforces, or to the overall blended workforce, it is extremely vital to best align the type of work with the type of workforce. For work that requires a great deal of skill, technical competence, and training, it might be best to develop a dedicated full-time workforce. Similar work might also be distributed to authorized third-parties in regions and areas where full-time workforce is not available. The extended workforce really comes into play where there is a greater volume of repeatable and ‘simpler’ work that does not require a high degree of training or extremely high degree of technical competence. Other factors must also be considered when aligning work, such as customer importance, customer affinity for service partner, contractual obligations, and more.

From a workforce supply perspective, more workers are considering freelance models as a primary way to work, or to supplement primary income. According to a 2016 study commissioned by Upwork and the Freelancers Union, up to 35% of the total US working population (or 55 million people) is currently choosing to freelance. Agility and flexibility is a concept desired by both employers and employees. And freelancing isn’t just for the new millennial workforce. Many older workers are looking at a freelance model to continue working and supporting their past employers during retirement.

In field service, a blended workforce model will likely be the most flexible path afforded to service leaders as they navigate workforce retirement, automation investment, and evolving customer needs. To maintain a high quality of work, steps need to be taken to ensure that the right type of work is matched with the right type of worker. I’ll be discussing this topic on a webcast hosted by our partner ClickSoftware on Dec 13. If interested in hearing more, please feel free to join (Registration required).

E: sd@servicecouncil.com
Tw: @suma1r

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